March 19, 2014
"All models are wrong, but some are useful."

— George E. P. Box

March 18, 2014
Cardinal directions are one of the basic elements of cartography. I’ve had this scan for a while. It names all the 128 cardinal directions in the Icelandic language. The original belonged to my grandfather and hangs in the family summerhouse back in Iceland. It seems that finally I might have to digitize this and create a proper vector graphic version. Perhaps this will be my contribution to safeguard the Icelandic language maybe. But having 128 words to choose from when pointing at something is far from practical, but it’s cool right?

Cardinal directions are one of the basic elements of cartography. I’ve had this scan for a while. It names all the 128 cardinal directions in the Icelandic language. The original belonged to my grandfather and hangs in the family summerhouse back in Iceland. It seems that finally I might have to digitize this and create a proper vector graphic version. Perhaps this will be my contribution to safeguard the Icelandic language maybe. But having 128 words to choose from when pointing at something is far from practical, but it’s cool right?

March 15, 2014
Lehman College course GEP 630 with Prof. Yuri Gorokhovich (Natural Hazards and Disasters). The goal of this nifty little exercise was to estimate the impact of a 10 meter Tsunami near JFK airport. No instructions given, just data.

Lehman College course GEP 630 with Prof. Yuri Gorokhovich (Natural Hazards and Disasters). The goal of this nifty little exercise was to estimate the impact of a 10 meter Tsunami near JFK airport. No instructions given, just data.

February 27, 2014
Lehman College course GEP 630 with Prof. Johnson (Geo-statistics). The 3 maps show rates mapped to the to the ZIP code level. The first one uses the raw rates but the second and the third use two different types of parametric smoothing called Empirical Bayes (EB), a global version and a local version. Note that although all the maps show rates classified into 5 classes (natural breaks) the values for each class are not the same when the maps are compared.

Lehman College course GEP 630 with Prof. Johnson (Geo-statistics). The 3 maps show rates mapped to the to the ZIP code level. The first one uses the raw rates but the second and the third use two different types of parametric smoothing called Empirical Bayes (EB), a global version and a local version. Note that although all the maps show rates classified into 5 classes (natural breaks) the values for each class are not the same when the maps are compared.

February 25, 2014
Icelandic police officers doing some accident cluster analysis in 1968. (original image).

Icelandic police officers doing some accident cluster analysis in 1968. (original image).

5:41pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZL9hAq18VtHdD
  
Filed under: iceland mapmaker police GIS 
February 4, 2014
I’ve been thinking a lot about GIS teaching methods lately and how powerful a simple image (or a map) can be. Here’s my very simple stab at explaining a digital elevation model (DEM) represented as a raster, how the elevation is stored in a single cell and how we might think of it in 3D. Only a draft and would presented with minimal text for clarification. Data from The National Land Survey of Iceland.

I’ve been thinking a lot about GIS teaching methods lately and how powerful a simple image (or a map) can be. Here’s my very simple stab at explaining a digital elevation model (DEM) represented as a raster, how the elevation is stored in a single cell and how we might think of it in 3D. Only a draft and would presented with minimal text for clarification. Data from The National Land Survey of Iceland.

January 29, 2014
Experimenting with a couple of things in ArcGIS like batch processing scripts and model shadows for the hillshade tool (and the Tumblr gif size limit!). Higher latitudes experience dramatic change in sunlight over a course of one year. This hillshade animations show sunlight for 21 June (summer solstice) in 2013 for the town of Isafjordur in Iceland located just north of 66°N on the spit in a fjord near the middle of the map. For some, there is no sunset. Ragnar Thrastarson - Lehman College GISc Program. Data: www.lmi.is/en

Experimenting with a couple of things in ArcGIS like batch processing scripts and model shadows for the hillshade tool (and the Tumblr gif size limit!). Higher latitudes experience dramatic change in sunlight over a course of one year. This hillshade animations show sunlight for 21 June (summer solstice) in 2013 for the town of Isafjordur in Iceland located just north of 66°N on the spit in a fjord near the middle of the map. For some, there is no sunset. Ragnar Thrastarson - Lehman College GISc Program. Data: www.lmi.is/en

January 18, 2014
Doing some gis for fun. This one is self explanatory.

Doing some gis for fun. This one is self explanatory.

January 1, 2014
Time well spent reading this one.

Time well spent reading this one.

December 15, 2013
Lehman College course GEP 605 with Prof. Maantay and Prof. Maroko. Created with ArcGIS in 2013. Scenario: You were asked by an environmental group to estimate the average annual concentration of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in New York City. As a point of reference, the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for average annual concentration PM2.5 is 15µg/m3. You will be using EPA air quality monitor data (n=15).

Lehman College course GEP 605 with Prof. Maantay and Prof. Maroko. Created with ArcGIS in 2013. Scenario: You were asked by an environmental group to estimate the average annual concentration of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in New York City. As a point of reference, the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for average annual concentration PM2.5 is 15µg/m3. You will be using EPA air quality monitor data (n=15).

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